The Top 200 Video Games of All-Time: #181-190

Our list continues of the top 200 video games of all-time (as voted upon by our followers) with #’s 181-190…

190) NHL 96
Considered to be one of the greatest sports games ever made NHL ’96 was the first game hockey game to include major and double minor penalties. The PC version was also the first game in the series to have multiple cameras, thanks to EA’s “Virtual Stadium Technology,” which was a big deal for the time. NHL ’96 also included fighting, complete with animations depicting knocking the losing player on his back, causing him to squirm on the ice, or pulling a jersey over his head while allowing you throw punches. Ah yes . . . simpler times.
189) Mega Man 8
Is it any surprise that Mega Man made the list? The eighth installment in the popular Capcom franchise, Mega Man 8 is a continuation of the original Mega Man storyline, complete with in-game cutscenes, as well as anime scenes. The game begins with Mega Man investigating a mysterious energy reading, but wouldn’t you know, right as he gets there the evil Dr. Wily is retreating with the mysterious power source. From there it’s more side-scrolling and platforming action with plenty of bad voice acting.
188) Mass Effect
Who can forget Bioware’s masterpiece Mass Effect? A video game which transformed the video game narrative and brought about the value of choice to the gaming experience. In Mass Effect, you play as Commander Shepard, whose mission it is to save the galaxy from the rogue specter named Saren. With the help of the crew of the Normandy and your ability to navigate relationships with various crew members, you set out amongst the cosmos, and it is beautiful. If you look past the latest entry, it’s hard to deny the legacy left by this game.
187) Ken Griffey Jr.’s Slugfest (1999)
One of the most complete sports games of the ’90s, Ken Griffey Jr.’s Slugfestprovided a complete experience with a Home Run Derby, season and World series mode while still maintaining solid gameplay and detailed play-by-play announcing. Many consider this one of the best sports games ever on the Nintendo 64 and Game Boy Color and helped pave the way for similar titles in the genre that came later such as the Major League Baseball 2k and MLB: The Show series of games.
186) Grand Theft Auto 4 (2008)
What is there to say about Grand Theft Auto 4 that hasn’t already been said? This sprawling adventure based in the fictional Liberty City (which is based on New York City) was one of the mainstays of the previous console generation. It’s the approach to creating a living breathing city in both a single-player campaign and multiplayer mode for many to try and emulate it but not quite duplicate it until its successor Grand Theft Auto V came along some five years later. The game still continues to have it fans whether it emanates from the mods created on the PC version or the extended life it received from the outstanding downloadable content added on in The Lost and Damned and The Ballad of Gay Tony.
185) Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance
The ninth installment and the first in the series to be released on the Nintendo Gamecube, Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance let you choose from a roster of up to 46 different characters each with their own unique abilities to battle the forces of darkness all while trying to prevent a civil war. The Fire Emblem series has always been unique in the fact that, whether they meant to or not, the narrative always finds you navigating some sort of social or political side-plot. And just like in the real world, Path of Radiance‘s villain seeks to exploit it.
184) Final Fantasy Tactics
As the first (and probably not the last) Final Fantasy game to make the list, Final Fantasy Tactics has a unique place in the hearts of gamers who grew up in the ’90s. Taking a break from the battle style of previous Final Fantasy gamesTactics is a turn-based game that takes place in the kingdom of Ivalice, which is later revisited in the numbered entry Final Fantasy XII. Not only is Final Fantasy Tactics the first in the series to use 3D in-game graphics, but it’s also the first to get a successful spin-off. Spend a few hours in this game, and you’ll see why it’s considered a cult-classic.
183) Chips Challenge
What great metaphor for life. Chips Challenge is a game released on the Atari in 1989 and is about a nerd in high school named Chip McCallahan, who is hopelessly in love with Melinda the Mental Marvel (try saying that five times fast). Chip asks Melinda to prom, but will only go if Chip solves a series of difficult puzzles. Sounds like dating has changed that much. The game features 148 tile-based levels full of frustration, but all through the game you can’t help but feel for our love-sick protagonist. Nearly twenty-six years later – thanks to religion and funding – Chips Challenge 2 was released on Steam, alongside the original game, complete with a level editor.
182) BloodRayne
What’s sexier than a half-vampire fighting nazis and other creatures of the dark? Well, not many things. BloodRayne is set in 1933 in a place where people believe in vampires. You play as a half-vampire named Rayne, who is looking for her father and kills anybody who gets in her way. Though hyper-violent, BloodRayne cornered a market that few video games dared to go, and for that reason, this 2002 gothic hack and slash game will forever be considered a classic amongst anybody who happened to pick it up on the Playstation 2, Xbox, Gamecube, or PC.
181) Xenoblade Chronicles 2
Probably the most modern game to make this list, Xenoblade Chronicles 2 is the first true sequel in the series and also the first to be released on the Nintendo Switch. Though the mythology gets a little difficult to track sometimes, its visuals are truly breath-taking, and it holds nothing back when you find your party roaming through areas with high-level enemies. There’s DLC slated to be released in the fall of 2018, but will it be enough to bring fans back to the never-ending sea of clouds? I guess we’ll find out.
Check out the rest of our list here:
#’s 81-90 https://tinyurl.com/y2ln3y9a

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